11:37 am - Sat, Apr 19, 2014
58 notes
boycottautismspeaks:

VERY IMPORTANT!!!! We’ve gathered evidence against Autism Speaks for unethical and unlawful financial practices. We are requesting that the IRS and other nonprofit/public interest entities investigate. Please sign and share.
Sign here ———-> http://www.change.org/petitions/internal-revenue-service-nonprofit-compliance-investigate-autism-speaks-for-unlawful-unethical-activity
Image Description: Black background with faded puzzle piece and text reading: Tell the IRS & Attorney Generals to investigate Autism Speaks for unethical & unlawful financial conduct.

Please sign and share.


This is a good idea, but has anyone tried to go through the normal reporting process at the IRS?  Using approved channels might get the parties who gathered the information a monetary reward which could be given to a better organization.

boycottautismspeaks:

VERY IMPORTANT!!!! We’ve gathered evidence against Autism Speaks for unethical and unlawful financial practices. We are requesting that the IRS and other nonprofit/public interest entities investigate. Please sign and share.

Sign here ———-> http://www.change.org/petitions/internal-revenue-service-nonprofit-compliance-investigate-autism-speaks-for-unlawful-unethical-activity

Image Description: Black background with faded puzzle piece and text reading: Tell the IRS & Attorney Generals to investigate 
Autism Speaks for unethical & unlawful financial conduct.

Please sign and share.

This is a good idea, but has anyone tried to go through the normal reporting process at the IRS?  Using approved channels might get the parties who gathered the information a monetary reward which could be given to a better organization.

(via eccentrickimmy1)

9:39 pm - Thu, Apr 17, 2014
29 notes
meteorologistaustenlonek:

"A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another." - John 13: 34-35

[The background of the image is a dim, blurry room.  A sunlit window, table, and door are visible.  Superimposed in the foreground is a round logo with grain on the left, a golden chalice with a wafer hanging over it in the middle, and grapes on the right.  Bellow, a banner reads ‘Maundy Thursday’ in sans-serif text with hard angles.  Under that, there is the quote “Love one another, as I loved you, so you must love one another.”  Under that, in smaller text, the passage is marked ‘John 13:34].’

meteorologistaustenlonek:

"A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another." - John 13: 34-35

[The background of the image is a dim, blurry room.  A sunlit window, table, and door are visible.  Superimposed in the foreground is a round logo with grain on the left, a golden chalice with a wafer hanging over it in the middle, and grapes on the right.  Bellow, a banner reads ‘Maundy Thursday’ in sans-serif text with hard angles.  Under that, there is the quote “Love one another, as I loved you, so you must love one another.”  Under that, in smaller text, the passage is marked ‘John 13:34].’

12:32 am
100 notes
autisticadvocacy:

Red text over an image of a printed page full of DNA sequences. The text reads “Finding a GENE won’t find me a JOB!”

autisticadvocacy:

Red text over an image of a printed page full of DNA sequences. The text reads “Finding a GENE won’t find me a JOB!”

(via autiecommie)

12:30 pm - Wed, Apr 16, 2014
37 notes

lipstick-autistic:

I think the weirdest thing I’ve discovered through this blog is that people respect me so much more as an autistic person than they ever have as an NT-passing person.

I make a pretty miserable excuse for an allistic, but apparently I’m pretty awesome at being autistic.

It’s annoying because I’m still closeted to 90% of people and I can’t help but wonder how life would change for me if I said ‘screw it’ and decided to be autistic all the time. I know there’d be some people who’d abandon me, but I feel like others might be more understanding and accepting of me if they knew why I do the things I do. I might even have an easier time finding work or getting educational services.

And yet I’m still too terrified to be open about who I am. 

It could be different in your community, but I know several openly autistic people in Atlanta.  We have not lost all that much.  I applied to the law school at UGA with a personal statement partly about being autistic, got in, and got a merit scholarship that is, if anything, a little high for my numbers.  UGA is a pretty respectable law school.  You have to do your own cost-benefit analysis, but it has gone alright for at least some people.

12:04 am
2 notes

autisticdetectives:

sorry i feel like i’m flooding the tag but i just have got a lot to say

my really good friend sometimes says things and it’s like. I feel like she sees autism as something stark and medical and has nothing to do with me really and it’s just. it;s a huge part of me and it’s not separate in any…

I grappled with this with my parents, and it took me forever to get some sense of how to do it.  If your friend is more into people and stories than raw, abstract ideas, it might help to think about what worked with my mother.  It never meant much to her when I talked about ableism and intersectionality, though she is educated.  I think she finally got that autism is a real part of real people from living with my dad, who never got formally diagnosed and is as unselfconsciously weird as any successful, older autistic person who grew up without the stigma.  Maybe she can learn from stories about where it is in your life.

10:57 pm - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
30 notes

Autistic Culture

I saw an interesting discussion on Facebook the other night following a call for thoughts and opinions on autistic culture.  What we are and where we are going seem like good questions.  What I have to say applies mainly to the U.S., somewhat, probably, to the rest of the anglophone world due to online contact, and maybe, to a very limited extent, to people in other parts of the world who know at least some English and have connected with us.  It will likely change with time, but this is what I think and feel about autistic culture and community today:

I Love it Sincerely, Irrevocably

There is so much to appreciate, from words like ‘stimming’ altered away from the medical sound, to the arts.  So many of us are musicians.  So many autistics, in the overlap with nerd culture, write the fanfiction that is the folklore of the Internet.  We are starting to care about our history, to assert that it has value.  Our blogs, avatars, and memes are often beautifully designed.  A lot of us use pseudonyms on the Internet.  Some people even hang onto pen names after becoming openly autistic.  The things we call ourselves are in-jokes, puns, references to history or culture, expressions of allegiance, background, or ideology.  We make beautiful things and name ourselves beautifully despite everything.  We rally around each other, and other disabled people, when someone is facing adversity.

No one wields social media better.  The way we can get a good story on the news saves lives.*  Anyone can raise a hurricane on the Internet given a few hundred thousand followers or likes.  Hardly anyone can pull that off with our unpredictable numbers and stubborn non-organization.  People from Tumblr, Facebook groups and Twitter, even the apolitical, take sounding and answering those calls seriously.  No hierarchy enforces that.  People just protect each other, a revolutionary idea.

Our leaders include so many that the wider world marginalizes.  Non-men are leaders.  Queer-identified people are everywhere.  There have been a more limited number of powerful voices from communities of color, maybe at least partly because of underdiagnosis.  That is a part of the autistic community that seems to be expanding and growing more vocal, especially around the problem of interactions with police.  Hopefully, good things will happen there.  The only leader who can usually count on most of our support comes from a minority religious tradition. 

The heart of our efforts, across many autistic communities and subcultures, is asserting the value of dependent and burdened lives.  Most of us routinely do something to guide, mentor, comfort, aid, fund, encourage, protect, or support people who will always need help to get by.  We center autistic children, and their parents, especially mothers.  That is not normal.  It is incredible, as is the way valued members of society, people with everything to lose, will demand to bear the stigma of autism in solidarity with those who have no choice.  I wish I knew that this would make us more just than things that have come before in the long run.  I hope so.

I Struggle With it Often

Our mildest problem may be the tendency of some men to poorly-conceal boundary pushing behind social awkwardness.  Complaints about that kind of behavior have been on the rise.  Autistic feminists are fierce enough that we would be alright by some time next week if it were the worst thing we were up against, but this is a bad smallest problem.

A lot of us have spent periods of our lives as victims.  Many, maybe most, autistic adults are damaged.  Consequently, I think, we inflict pain on each other.  IRL, I socialize with autistics and other disabled people.  That group has less drama, but its members self-select for basic relationship building abilities.  We can cope with giving and receiving affection, set clear boundaries, and handle each other gently on bad days.  Every website, social network, forum, and well-trafficked comment section has or has banned several autistics who seem to be in such agony that they lash out at everything within reach.

That has always looked less like autism than the various manifestations of trauma to me.  People within five years of my age, younger or older, seem to be in the worst health.  Yes, this is a health problem, maybe our largest public health problem.  It is hard to solve because poverty limits access to healthcare.  Many of us are poor.  Another contributing factor may be part of the narrative of what social justice means on young, liberal parts of the Internet.  I love that Internet and a lot of that narrative, like the insistence on justice for all, but it has flaws like any way of seeing the world.  It sometimes pushes people away from asking whether and to what extent they need to change or try to heal to be in community with others.  We all need to ask ourselves those kinds of questions sometimes, especially people who have been oppressed.  I hope more of us take on these challenges individually.  Collectively, it might help if we could find or make some safe, free or low-cost tools to help people get better.  No one deserves to live like some of us do.  The community needs it.  We might be better at solving external problems if some of these wounds healed.  We deserve to live as survivors, not victims.  I hope I see a day when even that is obsolete and we just are.

I Fear and Hope for its Future

One of the reasons it can be hard to voice pain and heal may be that we have been through and are going through an awful struggle that has smouldered and flared from Google to the JRC.  There may not be a name for this kind of thing yet, nor for the people who resisted alone from the time they were very young, who learned words like ‘ableism’ years after they understood the meaning.  We need a language for it.  That might attach more dignity and honor to what people got hurt doing, which, in turn might make it easier to admit to pain and figure something out.  That may or may not be through mainstream medical channels.  It just has to work for the individual in question.  Recovery needs to be a major project.

I know autistic children who are fairly happy, as safe as they can be in this world.  Some of them growing up now, and more who will come later, will not share this pain.  If we want to attract them and remain a viable culture, we have to have to be defined less by the legacy of suffering and resistance and more by our collective beauty.  They will come if we keep building, make things, and exist as something that anyone would be proud to claim.  A culture is a story.  If we want people to keep telling ours, it has to be a good one.  It has to stay intersectional and complex. 

We need room for diversity and dissent.  We have to allow for local differences in culture and reality.  We need every model and paradigm from the academic roots of online social justice to the desperate, deep South pragmatism that leads people who vehemently disagree on most things, who sometimes even hate each other, to work together on shared concerns.  If we can manage a laundry list of nearly impossible things, I would not be surprised if some of our great-grandchildren attended some 22nd century equivalent of Autreat.  It sounds like a tall order, but I have been optimistic about it lately.  We beat worse odds to get here. 

*TW medical ableism

5:59 pm - Sat, Apr 12, 2014
4,543 notes

thevoxbox:

theconcealedweapon:

Abled people complain about disabled people needing accommodations, because “in the real world there are no accommodations”.

But abled people receive accommodations all the time. Cars are an accommodation for those who can’t run a steady speed of 60 mph. Stairs are an accommodation for those who can’t jump from one story to the next. Phones are an accommodation for those who can’t communicate telepathically. Calculators are an accommodation for those who can’t do large math problems in their head. Lights are an accommodation for those who can’t see in the dark. Stoves are an accommodation for those who can’t heat things with their eyes. Clocks are an accommodation for those who can’t tell what time it is just by the position of the sun. Jackets are an accommodation for those who are susceptible to frostbite when it’s cold. 

Abled people receive accommodations all the time, but since it’s considered socially acceptable to need those accommodations, they’re not considered accommodations. But imagine if you lived in a world where you needed those accommodations but most people didn’t. That’s what it feels like to be disabled.

This is an incredibly important post. As one of my favourite professors said, “Technology is not innocent." As in, all technology had to be designed by a human being. And chances are, if that human being had any biases or assumptions that could be translated into the technology they created, they probably wound up in there. Practically everything is designed specifically for abled people. Think about cars, for example. Could you drive a car one-handed? Well, yeah, very likely, but since most people have two hands, they designed the cars to use both hands. Two hands to grip the steering wheel, buttons and levers on both sides of said wheel, etc. There is nothing that says cars are better when you design them for one specific degree of physical wellness, but yet that is exactly how they’re designed.  This extends to virtually everything human-made you see. I do mean everything.

So for the love of heaven, please don’t whine and complain when you see disabled people of any variety getting “special accommodations.” All technological design is purposeful. Every piece of technology you see was designed to accommodate someone. If you’re lucky enough to be accommodated by something’s most common design, don’t be an ass to people who would be better served by an alternate version.

(via lordlouiedor)

5:27 pm
139,915 notes
scifigrl47:

geardrops:

fastcompany:

Portable Robot Printer Is Like A Roomba That Squirts Ink

it’s so cute i want an army of them

OH MY GOD IT’S LIKE A MAGIC WRITING BOX I WANT IT.

scifigrl47:

geardrops:

fastcompany:

Portable Robot Printer Is Like A Roomba That Squirts Ink

it’s so cute i want an army of them

OH MY GOD IT’S LIKE A MAGIC WRITING BOX I WANT IT.

(via intheconcertkeyof)

4:56 pm
10 notes

I wish the reporter could have refrained from being ableist himself, but it is good to see someone talking about deaths like these.  Hers is not a family with the resources to create a scandal over this woman’s death, get to the bottom of it, get the state to inflict punishment, and maybe make sure there are more safeguards for the next person.  Maybe someone else will.

4:41 pm
64 notes

annoyingbullshit:

iamthethunder:

No test is perfect, but I feel like this quiz covers a lot and might be a good starting point for discussion in some circles.  It definitely recognizes the way in which people can have privilege in some areas and lack it in others.  Have other people seen it?  What do you think?

Oh fuck off, ‘privilege’ is bollocks. There’s nothing wrong with being white, wealthy, straight, cisgendered or anything else.

No one ever said there was.  Concern about privilege is concern about some groups having an unfair leg up.  It has nothing to do with feeling bad about one’s innate characteristics.  The idea is fairness.  Google words instead of getting angry when you have questions about what they mean.

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